Sunday, March 21, 2010

KB Shimmer In The Pot Swirling Video

If you really want to learn how to swirl soap watch these video's. KB Shimmer makes it look so easy, so I'm going to try to make soap using here swirling technique. I will post photos this week if they come out good, which I'm sure they will. Enjoy.




Sunday, March 14, 2010

Lego Soap Tutorial With Mold

I was just thinking about making lego soap for my kids, but I don't have a lego mold. I checked the lego store online, and they sold out of the particular mold that I wanted. Then I searched online and found this amazing tutorial at Roots & Wings Co. I would have posted the tutorial here, but it was way too long. Go check it out.

From Soap

Look at how easy it is to make your own mold.
From Soap

Mais Kes Ka Fee New E-Magazine Tutorial

Mais Kes Ka Fee has done it again, she finally has her third edition out for her popular e-magazine. It's free for all of us to read. She is extremely talented, and you shouldn't let her French shy you away from her site. Just search for her in Google, and her site will appear, and make sure you click the translate this page link that will find next to her site in the Google search.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Future Primitive Tutorial

Have you ever wondered how to make those thin lines in your soap? Well Future Primitive make an easy to follow video that shows you how.

How To Make Your Own Massage Candle

Here is a new tutorial video that I found on Homemade Bath Products Blog. It shows us how Soap Queen makes Massage Candles. Massage candles are a wonderfully luxurious treat to make for yourself or that special someone. A massage candle is a blend of skin safe waxes, oils and essential oils that melt at a low temperature, perfect for a warm and soothing massage.

Soap Queen TV - Massage Candles from Soap Queen on Vimeo.


If you would like to follow along, here are the ingredients Anne-Marie uses:

4 oz. Container Soy Wax
1 oz. Deodorized Cocoa Butter
4 oz. Avocado Oil
5 oz. Shea Butter
1/2 oz Ylang Ylang Essential Oil
1/2 oz Patchouli Essential Oil
4 six oz. Candle Tins
4 WU 250 Wicks

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

How To Make Your Own Massage Oil

Which Massage Oil is Best? There are many types of massage oils available. They range from single oils such as sweet almond oil, and sunflower oil. If you shop at spas, or skin care stores you're more likely to find blended massage oils containing two or more massage oils.

It's important to know the difference to make the best choice of massage oils for yourself.

1. Sweet Almond Oil
Sweet almond oil is one of the most popular massage oils among massage therapists. Extracted from almonds, sweet almond oil is pale yellow in color.

It is slightly oily, which allows hands to glide easily over skin. Sweet almond oil is absorbed fairly quickly, but not so quickly that you need to keep reapplying it.

Compared with other oils, sweet almond oil is reasonably priced. It usually does not irritate skin. People with nut allergies should not use almond oil.

2. Apricot Kernel Oil
Apricot kernel oil is similar in texture and color to almond oil, but costs slightly more. It is rich in vitamin E, a quality that gives it a longer shelf life than the typical oil.

Like almond oil, apricot kernel oil is absorbed into the skin, so it won't leave people feeling greasy afterwards. This property also makes it a good oil to use for aromatherapy massage.

Apricot kernel oil is a good alternative to sweet almond oil for people with nut allergies.

3. Jojoba Oil
Jojoba is actually a wax extracted from the seed of the jojoba plant. Jojoba is a good option for most people prone to back acne because it is thought to have antibacterial properties and contains long chain wax esters that closely resembles skin sebum.

Jojoba has a very long shelf life, so it's a good choice if you don't use it regularly.

It is very well-absorbed, which makes it a favorite carrier oil for aromatherapy. Jojoba is usually not irritating to skin.

One drawback: jojoba oil is so silky and quickly absorbed, you may need to reapply it often or mix it with other oils listed here. It is more pricey than sweet almond oil.

4. Fractionated Coconut Oil
Although you may think of coconut oil as being a thick, white solid oil, fractionated coconut oil is actually a light, non-greasy, liquid oil.

It is called fractionated coconut oil because it contains only a fraction of the whole oil. The long-chain triglycerides have been removed, leaving only the medium-chain triglycerides.

Fractionated coconut oil is less pricey than many other oils (it's comparable to sweet almond oil) and like jojoba oil, has a very long shelf life. But perhaps the top feature of fractionated coconut oil is that it tends not to stain sheets, a problem with most massage oils.

5. Sunflower Oil
Sunflower oil is a light, non-greasy oil that won't leave skin feeling oily. The oil, extracted from sunflower seeds, is rich in the essential fatty acid linoleic acid, as well as palmitic acid and stearic acid, all components of healthy skin. The amount of linoleic acid in skin declines with age and can be stripped by harsh soaps and cleansers.

Sunflower oil can go rancid quickly, so it should be purchased in small quantities and stored in a dark cool area. Squeezing one or two capsules of pure vitamin E oil into the bottle may help to extend the shelf life.

People with allergies to the sunflower plant family should avoid sunflower oil.

Other Massage Oils

* Avocado Oil
Avocado oil is pressed from the avocado fruit. Deep green in color, avocado oil is a heavier oil and is usually mixed with lighter massage oils such as sweet almond oil.

Avocado oil is roughly double the cost of sweet almond oil. People who are sensitive to latex may be sensitive to avocado oil.

* Cocoa Butter
Cocoa butter is very rich and has a distinct chocolate aroma. It is solid at room temperature and has a heavy texture, so it needs to be blended with other oils or used only for very small areas.

* Grapeseed Oil
In many respects, grapeseed oil makes a great massage oil. It has little-to-no odor, and it has a smooth, silky texture without being greasy.

However, most grapeseed oil is extracted from grape seeds using a solvent (rather than being pressed from the seeds), which some aromatherapists say make it an inferior oil for aromatherapy massage.

* Kukui Nut Oil
A light, thin, non-greasy oil. Native to a Hawaii, kukui nut oil is typically used on all skin types, including oily skin and sun-damaged skin.

* Olive Oil
Most people are familiar with olive oil as a cooking oil, but it is occasionally used for massage. It is a heavy oil with a greasy or sticky texture and recognizable aroma that many associate with cooking, so it's usually not used on its own for massage.

One study compared topical olive oil with sunflower oil and found that olive oil had no effect on epidermal barrier function, whereas topical sunflower oil resulted in significant improvement in the skin barrier.

* Sesame Oil
Sesame oil is prized in Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India. It is used in a daily Ayurvedic self-massage called abhyanga, as well as shirodhara.

According to Ayurveda, sesame oil is especially useful for nourishing and detoxifying and for ailments associated with the vata type, such as anxiety, poor circulation, constipation, bloating, and excessive dryness.

Sesame oil is a rather thick oil that may leave skin feeling oily, so it can be blended with lighter massage oils. The unrefined oil has a strong aroma.

* Shea Butter
Extracted from the seeds of a tree native to Africa, shea butter is a solid at room temperature. Like cocoa butter, shea butter is heavy and can leave an oily feeling on skin, so it is usually not used on its own for massage. It may be blended or used for very small areas.

Shea contains a natural latex, so people with latex allergies should do a patch test before using it.

* Wheat Germ Oil
Wheat germ oil is too thick to use on its own as a massage oil, but it can be blended with lighter oils. Wheat germ oil is rich in vitamin E.

And finally, instead of oil, massage therapists often use specially-formulated massage gels and lotions.


Basic Massage Oil Recipe
by Pioneerthinking.com

Ingredients:

* 6 teaspoons carrier oil of your choice
* 8 drops of essential/fragrance oil of your choice

Instructions:

Blend ingredients well.

Warm up your oil before doing any massage, it just feels the massage feel that much better.